July 07, 2018

Trump hires "Dave's accountant"

Jack Kemp

It seems that life is following art - in a good way.

As I previously pointed out here  http://tbirdnow.mee.nu/they_knew_in_1993_about_the_washington_swamp ; the 1993 movie "Dave"

In 1993, a movie called "Dave," about a small businessman who looked exactly like the President and brought from the Midwest to Washington to "play" the President while the real one underwent an operaton. Dave from the Midwest brought his local accountant, played by Charles Grodin, to Washington to help him conduct budget hearings and actually try to balance the budget. Grodin said a line that made me and many others in the audience cheer and applaud as he summarized his review of the Federal Budget by saying, "Who does these books? I mean if I ran my business this way, I'd be out of business."

And now, days after this Aviary post, we have an article by Brian McNicholl, about how the Trump Adminstration has done "the first ever agency wide audit of the Department of Defense."

https://townhall.com/columnists/brianmcnicoll/2018/07/07/pentagon-needs-to-stop-doing-business-with-foreign-fraudsters-n2497970?utm_source=thdaily&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=nl&newsletterad=

Among McNicholl's reporting are these items:

It previously had revealed through reports from the Office of the Inspector General that the Army had posted $6.5 trillion in accounting discrepancies in 2015, and from the Defense Logistics Agency – the procurement arm of the U.S. military – that it can’t account for $800 million in spending on construction projects.

Recently, we’ve found the Air Force seems to have awarded a multi-million dollar contract to a South Korean aviation firm with a lengthy history of fraud.

Nine executives at Korea Aerospace Industries, including former CEO Ha Sung-yong, were indicted last year on charges of bribery, embezzlement and defrauding the South Korean government. Prosecutors charged the then-CEO created a slush fund through a subcontractor and used it to bribe politicians and military leaders.

SECTION OMITTED

This is far from the first time the Department of Defense has done business with vendors who had been accused of fraudulent practices.

Another defense contractor, Kuwait-based Agility Logistics, held a contract worth $8.6 billion for supplying food to the U.S. military during the Iraq War.

In 2005 a former business partner and cousin of the company’s founder Tarek Sultan told authorities of Agility’s theft of millions of dollars from the U.S. government. The Department of Justice found Agility had presented false claims for payment, inflated prices and overcharged the U.S. for warehousing and distribution. Agility also used costlier vendors that would provide them a prompt payment discount, then failed to pass along rebates as required by contract.

 
Agility had been indicted for fraud against the United States and supposedly was forbidden to bid on new Defense Department contracts, yet it received a $40 million contract from the Defense Logistics Agency in 2015, and, in 2017, the government agreed to settle the matter for cash and a single misdemeanor charge.

Agility was represented by Stephen Ryan, a D.C. lobbyist with connections in the highest levels of government.

END OF QUOTE

I urge you to read the entire article above.

This type of information should have been made public years ago. And I don't delude myself into thinking that these type of questionable practices only happened under the administration of Democrat Barack Obama. I suspect there is a long history of this neglegence going back decades. A proper audit would have saved the Defense Department a literal fortune that could have been used for everything from better weapons systems to better PTSD care to buying closed burn pits on Iraqi and Afghan U.S. military bases so that service men and women wouldn't have to breath in open burn pit poisoned smoke, as detailed in the book "The Burn Pits" by Joseph Hickman, a Marine and Army (Intelligence) veteran and Senior  Research Fellow at Seton Hall University. The Aviary previously reported on Hickman's book and speech at a special presentation by the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America.

Posted by: Timothy Birdnow at 06:51 AM | No Comments | Add Comment
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