December 31, 2019

Walls Work

Timothy Birdnow

The Sheriff of Yuma Arizona says the border fence has cut crime by 91%.

The Yuma Border Patrol Sector used to be the worst in the country for illegal crossings, until it became a poster-child for the effectiveness of a border fence.

In 2005, before the fence, more than 2,700 vehicles crossed the Colorado River and open deserts, loaded with illegal immigrants and drugs, according to Border Patrol numbers.

Apprehensions steadily increased to more than 138,000 in fiscal 2005.

"Yuma battled entrenched smuggling groups for control of the border,” said Border Patrol in a video. "Mass incursions often left agents outnumbered 50 to 1. Agents were assaulted with rocks and weapons daily.”

Following the Secure Fence Act of 2006, Yuma tripled manpower and added mobile surveillance, as well as fencing and vehicle barriers.

Yuma went from having 5.2 miles of fencing to 63 miles, and subsequently saw an almost 95 percent decrease in border apprehensions by 2009, when Border Patrol made about 7,000 arrests.

It also directly affected what the sheriff’s department had to deal with.

"We were able to reduce [ancillary crimes] by 91 percent,” Wilmot said. "The deaths in the desert, the rapes, the robberies, the homicides, the burglaries, the thefts.”

But fences and walls don't work, we are told!

Well, when Attila and his army of Huns tried to invade China (he wanted to conquer China to turn it into a war machine to attack the Romans, whom he hated) he came to the Great Wall. After spending days trying to find a way around it the Scourge of God simply turned around and left. Worked pretty well there!

And the Roman Emperor Hadrian built a wall closing the border between Roman Britain and the wild lands of the Scots and Picts - and it seemed to work quite well for them. There was never a major invasion by the Scottish hordes into the peaceful, settled British lands.

Walls work great around prisons. And my fences keep people out of my backyard.

The notion that a wall or fence is pointless is beyond stupid. Of course, you can't rely solely on a passive deterrent; you have to guard it, too, and kick trespassers out. That's what we do on private property; nobody lets some trespasser stay and eat food and drink at a private party just because they made it inside. Unfortunately America does exactly that.

Posted by: Timothy Birdnow at 12:52 PM | Comments (8) | Add Comment
Post contains 401 words, total size 3 kb.

1 San Fran Nan, the Queen of Botox, must understand this as well. It's a well-known fact that her home in Poopville, CA* is well guarded by a wall.

* Sorry, I just couldn't resist. As Flip Wilson used to say, the devil made me to it. I'll now go stand in the corner say a bunch of Our Fathers and Hail Marys in penance.

Posted by: Dana Mathewson at December 31, 2019 06:40 PM (royi5)

2 Poopville is an accurate description; no apologies necessary.

Posted by: Timothy Birdnow at January 01, 2020 08:59 AM (ovXCa)

3 Well, even if accurate, scatological references are not necessarily appreciated by all. My wife would object, and I imagine Fay might not be amused.

Posted by: Dana Mathewson at January 01, 2020 10:26 AM (05Pmo)

4 I am mindful of Dante's Inferno; he makes all manner of references to such things, including a flatulent demon who sets sail with his own gas.  If it's good enough for Dante Alighieri...

Posted by: Timothy Birdnow at January 01, 2020 12:58 PM (ovXCa)

5 Dante may have been one of the first authors of any repute to use such a technique. When he was writing about "low subjects" he used vulgar language, and vice versa. I'm familiar with that reference you mention, in John Ciardi's excellent translation; and Ciardi talks about how Dante used the technique.

Posted by: Dana Mathewson at January 01, 2020 04:25 PM (sneiI)

6 That must have been shocking in it's day, Dana!  I love Dante'; he really had a vivid imagination, for sure.

I found Pergatoria rather dull, but Paradiso was also quite fascinating, although Inferno was clearly the best of the three.

Posted by: Timothy Birdnow at January 02, 2020 07:41 AM (VVMmP)

7 I got through the Purgatorio, but finally bailed out of the Paradisio, overwhelmed by all the splendor. I was, however, left with a profound appreciation for Dante. I'd read somewhere that Shakespeare basically created the modern English language, at least as a literary tool; and apparently Dante did the same for the modern Italian language. Quite a feat in both cases.

And to think that they were both old white men.

Posted by: Dana Mathewson at January 02, 2020 11:37 AM (Yp3LT)

8 Yeah; they both were imperialistic racists. I guess Shakespeare wrote Othello to make black guys look like crazy sex fiends...

Posted by: Timothy Birdnow at January 02, 2020 12:45 PM (vPUhz)

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