November 06, 2019

AOC, Andrew Yang get wish as NYC voters adopt ranked-choice voting system

Dana Mathewson

I have to admit that if these people are for it, I'm automatically against it, even before reading the article. So is the Heritage Foundation, as you'll see.

I'm against it because anything that tampers with the normal methods of voting usually works only in favor of the left. But let's see what it's all about.

New York City voters on Tuesday decided to amend the city’s constitution, restructuring primary and special elections to operate under a new ranked-choice voting system, which allows voters to rank their top five candidates on the ballot according to preference.

The plan had backing from U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y.,and Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang, a businessman and New York City resident.

The new ballot structure will eliminate New York’s traditional runoff elections, which take place for citywide offices if no candidate garners at least 40 percent of the vote, Politico reported. New York City will adopt the new ranked-choice system in primary and special elections for mayor, public advocate, comptroller, borough president, and city council beginning in January 2021.

Advocates such as Yang argued the system would free voters to cast ballots for third parties and pick the candidates they truly prefer rather than strategically go for the Republican for Democrat.

Yeah, that's what he says. Do you really think it will work that way?

"Just voted here in New York - Ranked Choice Voting is on the ballot!” Yang wrote on Twitter on Tuesday. "Ranked choice voting would let us express our true preferences and make our politics more dynamic and responsive. We should make it the norm throughout the country.”

Yang, who’s made ranked-choice voting a campaign issue, also says the system forces candidates to appeal to a wider range of voters rather than leaning on a narrow base.

Ocasio-Cortez, while encouraging New Yorkers to get out to the polls, said on Twitter "This year we have 5 ballot proposals, including one on RANKED CHOICE VOTING which is pretty cool.”

She sounds like New York City's version of a Valley Girl.
Ranked-choice voting has sometimes resulted in unorthodox campaign tactics -- including groups of candidates forming alliances against competitors to win the second- or third-place votes, Politico reported. California Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat, voted against a bill last month that would have permitted more cities and counties to use the system, saying it spurred too much voter confusion.
Newsom doesn't like it? Now I'm conflicted. Not really, though.

Posted by: Timothy Birdnow at 11:10 AM | Comments (2) | Add Comment
Post contains 434 words, total size 4 kb.

1 Since the Democrats have more party discipline they will be able to weather this better. Most Republican voters don't like the GOP, and the Dems know that; it would lead to third party voting by the GOP voters. Meanwhile, it makes illegal votes more potent. I think it is a bad idea.

Posted by: Timothy Birdnow at November 06, 2019 01:19 PM (QdQQ3)

2 I understand what you bring it very meaningful and useful, thanks. douchebag workout 2

Posted by: douchebag workout 2 at November 06, 2019 08:21 PM (LZcTp)

Hide Comments | Add Comment




What colour is a green orange?




19kb generated in CPU 0.06, elapsed 0.24 seconds.
37 queries taking 0.2288 seconds, 108 records returned.
Powered by Minx 1.1.6c-pink.
Always on Watch
The American Thinker
Bird`s Articles
Old Birdblog
Birdblog`s Literary Corner
Canada Free Press
Christian Daily Reporter

_+
Daren Jonescu
Dana and Martha Music On my Mind Conservative Victory
Eco-Imperialism
Infidel Bloggers Alliance
The Reform Club
FTP Student Action
Veritas PAC
FunMurphys
The Galileo Movement
Intellectual Conservative
br /> One Jerusalem
Powerline
Publius Forum
The Gateway Pundit
Thinking Democrat
Ultima Thule
Young Craig Music
Contact Tim at bgocciaatoutlook.com

Monthly Traffic

  • Pages: 38491
  • Files: 20141
  • Bytes: 871.6M
  • CPU Time: 97:00
  • Queries: 1603088

Content

  • Posts: 18408
  • Comments: 53548

Feeds


RSS 2.0 Atom 1.0